WELFARE & EDUCATION

Animal Welfare and EDUCATION

 

The SPCA does not have legal authority to respond to complaints of neglect and abuse under the current Animal Health & Protection Act. The SPCA educates the public about responsible pet ownership and promotes spay & neuter to reduce the pet population.
If you have a complaint of neglect or abuse in St. John's please call the RNC at 729-8000, or City Humane Services at 311. You can also call your local RCMP Detachment, or municipal animal control.
If you have questions regarding the Act or SPCA authority, please contact the Provincial Government's Animal Welfare Consultant at (709) 729-6879 or by email at animalwelfare@gov.nl.ca.

 

Since SPCA is no longer able to assist in investigating cases of Animal Welfare, we have changed our focus to produce education materials on this matter and this is the reason why we now have a Animal Welfare and Education committee. We now provide brochures on a variety of topic including the welfare of animals, adopting an animal, surrendering, tethering, signs of animal abuse,  spay and neutering and many more to come. We  offer  Presentation and Shelter Tours, that give an overview of  what we do at the  SPCA, Compassion and Empathy Toward Animals, Animal Safety, and Pet Care and Responsibility.  If you would like to book a presentation/tour or want to  know more information please email us at education@spcastjohns.org.

 

Pet Pals - Because it's never too early to make a difference!

PetPals is a free club for kids who want to help animals and learn. 

What happens after I sign up? You will receive a welcome package including an animal lovers’ colouring book and a membership card that entitles you to 10% off at the SPCA Thrift Store. Throughout the year, you will also receive monthly newsletters with SPCA happy stories, educational info & games, ways you can make a difference; invitation to monthly events; Pet Pals exclusive contests and invitations to VIP events!

Ready to join? Fill out an online application or download the Pet Pals membership brochure. 

 

 

Information on Adopting a Cat   |   Information on Adopting a Dog
What Pet is Right for Your Family?

 

 

Cat-Proofing Your Home

Your heart is ready for a new pet…but is your home?

We all know what they say about curiosity and cats! Let your cat explore safely by:

• Keeping closets and bathroom cabinets locked

• Putting small, easy-to-swallow trinkets and objects in hard-to-open boxes

• Sealing holes in walls and near pipes

• Getting in the habit of checking your dryer before you run it

• Closing your toilet lids

• Bundling cords, lamps, shades, and electrical cords

• Unplugging your electronics when not in use (or using wire covers to prevent chewing and electrocution)

• Sweeping regularly to get rid of potential choking hazards on the floor

• Moving chemical products and medication to higher shelves where cats can’t reach them

• Shutting windows when you leave the house to prevent indoor kitty escapes

 

Check your kitchen! Check your garden!

Plenty of popular house plants, herbs, fruits and vegetables and other foods (including chocolate!) can be toxic to animals. Research what they are and, if you have them, put them where your pet can't reach them.

**Tip: Buy your kitties some cat grass to give them something cat-friendly to chew instead!

Finally: if you have a dog, move your cat's litter box to a spot where the dog can't reach it. If possible, you may want to install a cat door so that Kitty can reach the litter, but Doggy can’t.

Need further safety suggestions? Ask your SPCA adoption agent!

Download Brochure

 

Dog-Proofing Your Home

Your heart is ready for a new pet…but is your home?

Keep your dog safe by:

• Keeping closets and bathroom cabinets locked

• Putting small, easy-to-swallow trinkets and objects in hard-to-open boxes

• Closing your toilet lids

• Bundling cords, lamps, shades, and electrical cords

• Unplugging your electronics when not in use (or using wire covers to prevent chewing and electrocution)

• Sweeping regularly to get rid of potential choking hazards on the floor

• Moving chemical products and medication to higher shelves where dogs can’t reach them

• Shutting windows when you leave the house to prevent doggy escapes

 

Check your kitchen! Check your garden!

Plenty of popular house plants, herbs, fruits and vegetables and other foods (including chocolate!) can be toxic to animals. Research what they are and, if you have them, put them where your pet can't reach them.

Need further safety suggestions? Ask your SPCA adoption agent!

Download Brochure

 

I Can No Longer Care For My Pet

What should I do?

Adopting an animal is a big commitment. Part of that commitment is making sure that your animal will have a loving, safe home if you are no longer able to give it one.

 

First:

Explore all options. Is your situation a temporary one? Illness, loss of job and travel can all interfere with your ability to care for your animal – but they don’t have to last forever. Ask around. A family member or friend may be willing to help care for your animal while you can’t.

 

If you really must give up your pet:

Try first to re-home your animal. As its owner, you are in a great position to answer potential adopter questions and to find the right fit for your pet’s new home.

 

Where can I find a new home?

Ask friends and family. People who know your animal might be happy to take him or her home.

Post an ad at local animal clinics. This is a fantastic option, as you know that anyone coming into the clinic is most likely an animal lover – and probably already an animal owner. And you know that they value animal health!

Post an ad online.Some websites, like Kijiji, have sections for pets needing new homes. Many happy animal-human new families have been formed this way, but use caution – sadly, some animals adopted online do end up in dangerous situations.

• Make sure you meet the potential adopters in person.

• Don’t be afraid to ask to visit their home and to make sure it will meet your animal’s needs.

• You may wish to ask the adopter for a small adoption fee or charity donation just to make sure they are adopting your animal for love and company, and no other reason.

I tried all of those things. No luck. Now what?

A last resort is to surrender your pet to your local Humane Services department, or the SPCA. While your animal will receive plenty of food, care and love while it is with us, shelter environments are stressful environments for the animal, and should only be used if there are no other options available.


How do I surrender an animal?

• Contact the SPCA at (709) 726-0301 or shelter to make an appointment. Please note that we frequently have waiting lists for cats.

• During your appointment, please provide us with information about your animal’s personality and medical history.f

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